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Local Singer Terry Barber's Album "Christmas Presence" Being Considered For Grammy Nomination

Terry Barber is also the founder of Artists For A Cause. His album is being considered for the Best Traditional Pop Solo Album category. Find out more about Terry Barber by clicking HERE. More information about Artists For A Cause can be found by clicking HERE.
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Fire Safety During Florida's Dry Season

As a wildfire kills people and destroys property in Gatlinburg, Tennessee we're reminded to take precautions to prevent fires during Florida's dry season. For more information on wildfires click HERE.
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Tune in this Saturday for The Toll Brother's Metropolitan Opera

Manon Lescaut Overview❘ Creators❘ Setting❘ Related❘ Anna Netrebko and Kristine Opolais share the title role, a heroine as alluring and irresistible as her adored city of Paris.

HD 2 Problems

We have been receiving inquiries from listeners concerning problems streaming HD2 . We are working to have this problem corrected as quickly as possible and apologize for any inconvenience. Thank you for listening and we appreciate your patience.
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Treasure Coast Weather from The FPREN Storm Center

This Week's Treasure Coast Essay

Another golf course

Nov 28, 2016

This is Paul Janensch with a Treasure Coast Essay about a plan for yet another golf course in Martin County.  According to the Stuart/Martin County Chamber of Commerce, the county already is home to “35 world-class golf courses.”  TCPalm.com, reports that NBA Hall of Famer Michael Jordan and other investors want to build Number 36.  It would cover 227 vacant acres in Hobe Sound.  The club would be exclusive and expensive, as are the nearby Medalist, McArthur and Loblolly golf clubs.  County approval is needed.  Why does Martin County have so many golf courses?  The weather, the undu

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On the next Snap ... "Weight Of The World." Everyone has a secret. Some secrets are heavier than others.

So you're trying to find some information about the schools in your community. Did students perform well on tests? How many students in a school are from low-income families? What's the demographic breakdown? Most folks would start to look for this by searching the web. But, depending on the state you live in, finding that information can be a real challenge.

Four days. 92 volunteers. And 150 pounds of gingerbread.

That's just part of what goes into decorating for the White House for Christmas.

Volunteers went to work the day after Thanksgiving, stringing thousands of bow ribbons and crystal ornaments throughout the mansion. Military families got a sneak peak at the decorations this week.

In the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, tens of thousands of people have fled a brutal, Russian-backed regime offensive against rebel-held parts of the city. Many have fled deeper into the tightening siege, which started over the summer. Others have sought safety on the government-held side.

My conversation with a woman who recently fled the siege begins with her asking how I am. She's safe now, but is still afraid to give her name. She fears for her son — still fighting with the rebels — and for other male relatives who've been detained by the regime for questioning.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Let's pause now to remember a British actor best known for playing a Spanish waiter in a 1970s BBC series that lasted only 12 episodes - Andrew Sachs. He died at age 86. As NPR's Ted Robbins tells us, his relatively small role left a big impression.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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This week in race: Sports (dog) whistles, protection for Dreamers, a special book—and some hunky calendar men. Really.

Now that the turkey endorphins have worn off, the leftovers are a distant memory, and the Obamas prepare for their last Christmas in the White House, we thought we'd put some of the things that happened over the holiday weekend (and this week) on a platter and offer them to you. No thank you notes required.

Race and Immigration:

For six years, Haitian activists have demanded that the United Nations accept responsibility for cholera in Haiti.

Yet many seemed almost shocked on Thursday by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's apology for the U.N.'s role in the outbreak. Shocked — and pleased.

The Dallas County District Attorney has reached an agreement to drop assault charges against former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel, as long he as meets conditions such as attending an anger management course and a substance abuse program.

Retired Gen. James Mattis' nomination to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of defense may, well, march through the Senate, but there is one potential obstacle to maneuver around: the retired general part.

The National Security Act of 1947, which established the current national defense structure, had a key stipulation, requiring that the secretary of defense be a civilian well removed from military service. In fact, the law is quite clear:

Each year, a glowing mass of clouds forms over the South Pole, high in the atmosphere, trapped between Earth and space.

From the ground they look wispy and shimmery, like a blue-white aurora borealis. From space, they look like an electric-blue gossamer haze.

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