Joseph Shapiro http://wqcs.org en National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools http://wqcs.org/post/national-data-confirms-cases-restraint-and-seclusion-public-schools The practice of secluding or restraining children when they get agitated has long been a controversial practice in public schools. Now, new data show that it's more common than previously understood, happening at least 267,000 times in a recent school year.<p>NPR worked with reporters from the investigative journalism group ProPublica, who compiled data from the U.S. Wed, 18 Jun 2014 21:59:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 45154 at http://wqcs.org National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools Michigan's High Court Limits The Fees Billed To Defendants http://wqcs.org/post/michigans-high-court-limits-fees-billed-defendants Transcript <p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.<p>MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: <p>And I'm Melissa Block. Michigan's top court, today, moved to put limits on what local governments can charge defendants who go through the court system. The court ruled in a case we told you about last month of a man who got billed more than a thousand dollars for his court costs. Wed, 18 Jun 2014 21:32:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 45155 at http://wqcs.org Court Fees Drive Many Poor Defendants Underground http://wqcs.org/post/court-fees-drive-many-poor-defendants-underground The use of fines and fees charged to criminal defendants has exploded. <a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/05/19/312158516/increasing-court-fees-punish-the-poor">An NPR investigation</a> has found people who can't afford those charges can go to jail for not paying. Hundreds of thousands are hiding from police and the courts. <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. Wed, 21 May 2014 20:39:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 43883 at http://wqcs.org Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons http://wqcs.org/post/supreme-court-ruling-not-enough-prevent-debtors-prisons Debtors prisons were outlawed in the United States nearly 200 years ago. And more than 30 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court made it clear: Judges cannot send people to jail just because they are too poor to pay their court fines.<p>That decision came in a 1983 case called <em>Bearden v. Georgia</em>, which held that a judge must first consider whether the defendant has the ability to pay but "willfully" refuses.<p>However, the Supreme Court didn't tell courts how to determine what it means to "willfully" not pay. Wed, 21 May 2014 09:22:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 43840 at http://wqcs.org Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons Big Fees For The Big Easy's Poorest Defendants http://wqcs.org/post/big-fees-big-easys-poorest-defendents In the next installment of an <a href="http://www.npr.org/series/313986316/guilty-and-charged">NPR investigation</a>, Joseph Shapiro goes to New Orleans to look at the ways poor people are charged for their public defender in court. <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.<img src="http://www.google-analytics.com/__utm.gif?utmac=UA-5828686-4&utmdt=Big+Fees+For+The+Big+Easy%27s+Poorest+Defendants&utme=8(APIKey)9(MDAyOTk4OTc0MDEyNzcxNDIzMTZjM2E3Zg004)"/></div><p>Transcript <p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. Tue, 20 May 2014 20:57:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 43822 at http://wqcs.org Unpaid Court Fees Land The Poor In 21st Century Debtors' Prisons http://wqcs.org/post/unpaid-court-fees-land-poor-21st-century-debtors-prisons Debtors' prisons were outlawed in the United States back before the Civil War. But an NPR <a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/05/19/312455680/state-by-state-court-fees">state-by-state survey</a> found that people still get sent to jail for unpaid court fines and fees. <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. Tue, 20 May 2014 10:17:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 43782 at http://wqcs.org Campus Rape Reports Are Up, And Assaults Aren't The Only Reason http://wqcs.org/post/campus-rape-reports-are-and-there-might-be-some-good The number of "forcible rapes" that get reported at four-year colleges increased 49 percent between 2008 and 2012. That's the finding of an analysis by NPR's Investigative Unit of data from the Department of Education.<p>That increase shows that sexual assault is a persistent and ugly problem on college campuses. Wed, 30 Apr 2014 21:25:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 42930 at http://wqcs.org Campus Rape Reports Are Up, And Assaults Aren't The Only Reason Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again http://wqcs.org/post/shooting-unfairly-links-violence-mental-illness-again With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.<p>Experts in mental health say (even as <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/04/03/298708884/what-do-we-know-about-the-fort-hood-gunman">more facts</a> about Lopez emerge) that it's highly unlikely the violence could have been predicted. Thu, 03 Apr 2014 23:14:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 41718 at http://wqcs.org Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies http://wqcs.org/post/mastermind-body-stealing-scheme-dies Dr. Michael Mastromarino died Sunday after battling liver and bone cancer. He was 49.<p>Mastromarino pleaded guilty to "body stealing." In 2008, he was sentenced to up to 58 years in prison.<p>But he continued to insist that he'd been misunderstood. He spoke to NPR, working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, last year from a prison near Buffalo, N.Y.<p>As soon as we'd clipped on his microphone and before we could even test the recording level, the tall, bald man in a green prison jumpsuit was defending himself. Wed, 10 Jul 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 30272 at http://wqcs.org Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies Turning Up The Heat On Civil Rights-Era Cold Cases http://wqcs.org/post/turning-heat-civil-rights-era-cold-cases Six years ago, the FBI took on a challenge: To review what it called cold-case killings from the civil rights era. The investigation into 112 cases from the 1950s and 1960s is winding down, and civil rights activists are weighing the FBI's efforts.<p>The review comes with word this week of the death of a man who'd been named, <a href="http://www.concordiasentinel.com/news.php?id=5893">by a newspaper investigation</a>, as a possible suspect in one notorious case.<p><strong>The Case</strong><p>The investigation was of the death of Frank Morris, in Ferriday, La., in 1964. Sat, 18 May 2013 09:17:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 27741 at http://wqcs.org