The Salt
2:26 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Earliest Cookware Was Used To Make Fish Soup

Pots like this 15,000-year-old vessel from Japan are among the world's earliest cookware.
Tokamachi City Museum

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 4:37 pm

Roasted fish on a stick is OK, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to cook up some fish soup?

That's what might have crossed the minds of hunter-gatherers who made the world's first cooking pots. A new analysis of pottery made 15,000 years ago in what's now Japan reveals that it was used to cook seafood, probably salmon.

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The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Test-Tube Baby Pioneer Dies

Dr. Robert Edwards holds the world's first "test-tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978. A midwife stands in the center, with gynecologist Patrick Steptoe on the right.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:27 pm

The man whose research led to the world's first test-tube baby more than three decades ago, has died at age 87.

Robert Edwards, who later won the Nobel Prize, began experimenting with in vitro fertilization, or IVF, in the late 1960s. His work, controversial at the time, eventually led to the birth of the world's first "test tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978.

Since then, IVF has resulted in about 5 million babies worldwide, according to the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology.

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Politics
1:38 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Congress Nears Agreements On Guns And Immigration

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:23 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Robin Kelly's in in Chicago, Anthony Weiner wants back in in New York, and Mitch McConnell claims somebody broke in and bugged his campaign office. It's Wednesday and time for...

SENATOR MITCH MCCONNELL: Nixonian...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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Arts & Life
1:26 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

The Prickly Process Of Changing Your Name

At 24, Silas Hansen left his birth name, Lindsay, behind.
Raena Shirali

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 2:00 pm

Names are possessions that we carry with us all our lives. But we seldom think about what goes into picking the right one. Some choose to change their first names in adulthood, because of family history or pure disdain for a moniker. For Silas Hansen, the reason was that he's transgender.

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Religion
1:26 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

'Til Faith Do Us Part': The Price Of Interfaith Marriage

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:19 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

In this day and age, interfaith marriage doesn't seem like that big a deal. They represent close to half of all marriages in this country over the past 10 years. The decision can also come with a price, though: disagreement on how to raise children and higher rates of divorce. There are benefits, as well, according to Naomi Schaefer Riley, author of "Til Faith Do Us Part: How Interfaith Marriage is Transforming America." She'll join us in just a moment.

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Economy
1:26 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

How The Latest Budget Could Affect You

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:51 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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The Salt
12:33 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

A Battle Over Antibiotics In Organic Apple And Pear Farming

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 11:31 am

Note: We've updated the headline on this post for the sake of clarity. To be clear, it's the apple and pear tree blossoms that get sprayed with antibiotics, not the fruit itself.

Apples and especially pears are vulnerable to a nasty bacterial infection called fire blight that, left unchecked, can spread quickly, killing fruit trees and sometimes devastating whole orchards.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

She Won $40,000! No, It Was $40 Million! Happy Dance Time!

When Maria Carreiro found out she had won $40 million, she danced with joy. She recreated her "happy dance" for reporters, as a video posted by The Windsor Star shows.
The Windsor Star

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 12:58 pm

Maria Carreiro of Toronto was thrilled when she thought she had won $40,000 (Canadian).

Then her daughter went to the Web and figured out that mom had won $40 million Friday in Canada's Lotto Max game. That's about $39.4 million in U.S. dollars.

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Shots - Health News
12:24 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Patent Medicines Get A Belated Chemical Checkup

Dr. Sawen's Magic Nervine Pills contained calcium, iron, copper and potassium. Despite advertising claiming they were free of lead and mercury, both elements were found in the pills.
Courtesy of Mark Benvenuto

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:04 am

The patent medicines sold in days gone by may, contrary to the name, not have had real government patents. But that didn't stop their makers from claiming the concoctions could cure ailments ranging from indigestion to jaundice and fever.

Now, researchers have put some of these old elixirs and pills in the Henry Ford Museum's large collection of patent medicines to a modern test. They found a mix of potentially harmful metals like lead and mercury along with benign ingredients, including calcium and iron.

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Around the Nation
12:14 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

'My Family Will Never Forget' Says Sister Of Newtown Victim

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Today, we're going to be talking about something that preoccupies many Americans, no more so than since last December. That, of course, is when that awful shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., took place.

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