All Tech Considered
1:02 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Using An App To Report Injured Wildlife

A rescued bobcat waits to be fed at a wild animal sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 1:04 pm

If you find an injured bird in your back yard, do you know who to call? The Boulder, Colo., group Animal Watch has developed a free iPhone and iPad application and a website called AnimalHelpNow designed to assist with such an emergency. The app and site only work for locations in Colorado, but its developers hope to expand the program nationally.

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Sports
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

What's The Extreme Sports Rivalry In Your Life?

The Louisville Cardinals will face the University of Kentucky Wildcats in the Final Four of the 2012 men's NCAA tournament. The long-time rivalry between these two Kentucky teams is just one example of conflicting team loyalties that can divide families, friends and neighbors for generations.

Opinion
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Op-Ed: Hate The Bus? It's Time To Reconsider

piece for Salon.com, Will Doig argues that it's time for Americans to reconsider the bus." href="/post/op-ed-hate-bus-its-time-reconsider" class="noexit lightbox">
In a piece for Salon.com, Will Doig argues that it's time for Americans to reconsider the bus.
iStockphoto.com

Everyone loves to hate riding the bus — passengers complain about cleanliness, overcrowding, timeliness and inefficiency. In a piece for Salon.com, writer Will Doig argues that disliking the bus is "practically an American pastime," but buses are key to improving mass transit. Doig thinks that rather than spending money on expensive new systems like light rail or streetcars, cities should focus on making buses better.

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Health Care
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

As Arguments Wrap, Future of Health Law Is Unclear

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:42 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. All this week, the U.S. SUPREME COURT commanded the nation's attention through three days of oral arguments on what may well be its most important case in decades.

The court's ruling could affect the lives of millions, redefine the role and limits of the federal government, and change the character of the 2012 election. We don't expect to know how the justices will rule until late June, but that doesn't stop journalists and legal experts from reading between the lines.

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Gingrich Is 'At The End Of His Line' Says His Biggest Financial Supporter

Sheldon Adelson.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images
  • NPR's Peter Overby, during the noon ET Newscast

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Shots - Health Blog
12:55 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Like The U.S., Europe Wrestles With Health Care

A patient is treated at the Nord Hospital in Marseille, France, in February. European countries have also been engaged in intense debates on the future of their health care systems, where universal coverage is the norm.
Anne-Chrisine Poujoulat AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 3:57 pm

The U.S. has been absorbed by the Supreme Court case this week on the future of health care. But Americans are not alone.

Several European nations, where universal health care has been the norm for decades, have been waging their own intense debates as they also deal with aging populations and rising costs.

Britain passed a new health care measure earlier this month, after more than a year of rancorous debate. Can the European experience cast some light on the American debate over health care?

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Study: Conservatives' Trust In Science At Record Low

Elizabeth Burrows of LaGrange, Kentucky, walks with her children, as they tour the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky. The privately funded museum exhibits the Earth's history according to the Bible.
Mark Lyons Getty Images

While trust in science has remained flat for most Americans, a new study finds that for those who identify as conservatives trust in science has plummeted to its lowest level since 1974.

Gordon Gauchat, a sociology professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studied data from the General Social Survey and found that changes in confidence in science are not uniform across all groups.

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It's All Politics
12:07 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Santorum Seeks Some Of Reagan's Jelly Belly Magic

A portrait of President Ronald Reagan made from jelly beans at the Jelly Belly Co. visitor center, in Fairfield, Calif., in June 2004. The photo was taken shortly after his death.
STEVE YEATER AP

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:32 am

For some people, few things say "Ronald Reagan" like Jelly Belly candy, apparently. Which explains why Rick Santorum will be holding a rally at the California headquarters of the candy maker Thursday.

Santorum is scheduled to attend a "Rally for Rick" event at the Jelly Belly Candy Co. facility in Fairfield, Calif.

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Music Interviews
12:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Brian Courtney Wilson On Fame And 'God's Promise'

A few years ago, the Houston native left his job in corporate America to pursue his musical dreams. This year, Brian Courtney Wilson's sophomore album, So Proud, debuted at number one on Billboard's Gospel Albums chart. He tells host Michel Martin that he prays that God continues to reveal the music his listeners can lean on.

Law
12:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Who Writes Our Laws?

Trayvon Martin's death has put a spotlight on Florida's "stand your ground" law. The American Legislative Exchange Council uses that law as a model and encourages other states to adopt it. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lisa Graves of the progressive watchdog Center for Media and Democracy. She says ALEC is fueled by corporate interests.

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