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Presidential Race
2:37 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Romney Edges A Victory In Maine Caucuses

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets supporters at a caucus in Portland, Maine, on Saturday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Stung by a series of defeats earlier this week, Mitt Romney got a much-needed boost Saturday with a win in the straw poll of the Conservative Political Action Conference and a victory in Maine's nonbinding caucuses.

Yet Romney walked away without delegates and tallied fewer votes there than he did four years ago. This time, he barely beat rival Ron Paul.

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Europe
9:28 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Old Money Helps Spanish Village Stay Afloat

A poster reading "The peseta is back" stands in Salvaterra de Mino, northwestern Spain. Some areas in Spain are returning to their former currency to make extra cash during the debt crisis.
Miguel Riopa AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 2:09 pm

Villamayor de Santiago, population 2,500, is a small village just south of Madrid, Spain.

It's famous for three Manchego cheese factories and a windmill that stopped turning decades ago. More than one-third of the town is unemployed.

After Christmas, shopkeepers decided to jump-start their economy.

"We realized there's no money here — well, no euros anyway — in the pockets of our customers," says Luis Miguel Campayo, head of the local merchants' association.

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The Record
9:15 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Whitney Houston: Her Life Played Out Like An Opera

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:32 pm

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Economy
5:22 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

N.C. Regulator Tapped To Handle $25B Mortgage Deal

There was one little-noticed part of this week's announcement about the $25 billion national mortgage settlement. North Carolina's banking commissioner, Joseph Smith Jr., will take over a new role and serve as independent monitor. He'll oversee the five banks which agreed to new mortgage loan servicing and foreclosure standards.

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Anti-Government Protests Roil Egypt
4:44 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

A Year After Mubarak, Where Does Egypt Stand?

Protesters gather for a demonstration to demand the ouster of the country's military rulers at Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday.
Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

A year ago today, tens of thousands of Egyptians gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square and celebrated a previously unimaginable achievement: the toppling of Hosni Mubarak.

But one year later, Egypt is far from stable and far from the democratic utopia many activists imagined. Is the nation better off?

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Analysis
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Week In News: A Week Of Deals For Obama

James Fallows of The Atlantic talks to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about President Barack Obama's compromise on providing reproductive services mandated by health care law after resistance from religious institutions and his latest cover story for The Atlantic on Obama's demeanor and a recent deal reached with five of the biggest banks in the country to pay back individuals whose homes were wrongly foreclosed on.

Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Oklahoma Opts Out Of Foreclosure Deal

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Well, every single state in the country will get a piece of that $26 billion to help troubled homeowners keep their homes, every single state except Oklahoma. The attorney general in Oklahoma decided to opt out of the multistate settlement to hold banks accountable for questionable lending and foreclosure practices.

Scott Pruitt is Oklahoma's attorney general, and he joins me now on the line. Attorney General, welcome.

SCOTT PRUITT: Well, thank you, Guy.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 11, 2012

Hard Times Familiar in Okfuskee County, Okla.

Okfuskee County in Oklahoma is the birthplace of Woody Guthrie, who would have turned 100 this year. Much of the economic problems Guthrie sang about were from what he saw in the county, which was once the largest all-black community in the country. Guthrie's music still resonates there, especially in the town of Boley, where hope is hard to come by. Logan Layden of State Impact Oklahoma reports.

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Europe
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Euro-Courts Blasted Over Al-Qaida Suspect's Release

Britons are in an uproar over a judge's decision to release a Muslim preacher suspected of al-Qaida links. The British government wanted to deport him to Jordan, where he's been convicted on terrorism charges, but European courts won't allow that because the convictions were based on evidence obtained by torture. NPR's Phil Reeves tells host Scott Simon that the case has stirred up resentment.

Sports
8:00 am
Sat February 11, 2012

Sports: Lin Shoots For Stardom; Patriot Fans Sour

Lin-sanity grips basketball! Gripes and second-guesses grip Pats fans! And what do we owe great four-legged athletes when they go past their prime? Host Scott Simon talks with NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman about the sports of the week.

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