All Things Considered

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Planet Money
3:42 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

A Father Of High-Speed Trading Thinks We Should Slow Down

Thomas Peterffy, shown here in 2010
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 3:54 pm

First, three stories from Thomas Peterffy's life as a trader:

Story #1:

When Peterffy was a kid growing up in communist Hungary in the 1950s his buddy went to Austria and brought back a pack of Juicy Fruit gum. Peterffy bought the pack, broke the sticks of gum up into little pieces, and sold them at a profit. The principal at his school was not amused. "Where's your communist conscience?" the principal asked.

Not surprisingly, given story #1, Peterffy moved to the U.S. as a young man.

Story #2:

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Afghanistan
2:50 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

Afghan Women Fear Backsliding On Key Gains

Soraya Paksat of Voice of Afghan Women holds a knife that was confiscated from a woman who came to visit a young relative in one of the group's shelters. The woman intended to kill the girl for fleeing an abusive father.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:23 pm

The gains by Afghan women are seen as one of the country's most important achievements over the past decade. But as the international community draws down its military and aid presence, those hard-won gains are at risk of being lost, according to activists.

Women are still being beaten, raped and forced into early marriage at alarming rates. And women's advocacy groups say they are already seeing signs of backsliding by the government when it comes to protecting women, and fear this could accelerate in the coming years.

A 16-Year-Old's Struggle

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National Security
5:08 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Obama's Warfare: 'From Power To A Policy'

A boy watches a group of Afghan and U.S. commandos in their up armored Humvee in Shindand Afghanistan. The special forces have become more prominent in the U.S. war effort.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 5:30 pm

It's hard to know if 16-year-old Abdulrahman al-Awlaki was a target or collateral damage.

Al-Awlaki, a U.S. citizen, was killed last fall at a barbeque with friends. His father, Anwar al-Awlaki, an al-Qaida supporter and also American-born, was killed in a drone strike two weeks earlier in Yemen.

The two of them, plus one more man, now make three Americans — three of thousands — who are believed to have been killed by America's top secret drone warfare program.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Tropical Storm Isaac Looms Over GOP Convention

In Tampa, Fla., Republicans are closely watching the weather. Tropical Storm Isaac is expected to pass by Tampa Monday, bringing heavy rain and wind. Monday also marks the day the GOP convention was to supposed to start, but organizers decided it was safer to cancel the first day of events. Guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR's Jeff Brady about the preparations.

Race
4:12 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Advantage Tennis: Improving Game's Racial Disparity

Serena Williams, left, and Venus Williams compete in Wimbledon at the 2012 Summer Olympics.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 5:04 pm

Venus and Serena Williams, Sloane Stephens and Donald Young will be among those vying for Grand Slam Glory at the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, which start Monday at Flushing Meadows in New York.

Those four are the only African-Americans who rank among the top 100 men's and women's players in the country at this stage. Some tennis enthusiasts say the game has got to do better than that – and they are working at the grassroots to level the playing ground.

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Author Interviews
2:44 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

'A Contest Of Wits': A Former Forger Recalls His Art

After John F. Herring by Ken Perenyi, circa 1989.
Courtesy of Pegasus Books

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 10:11 am

Next time you're admiring a 19th century American master painting at a museum or auction house, take a closer look. What looks like an authentic creation complete with cracks and yellowing varnish could actually be the work of forger Ken Perenyi.

Perenyi made millions of dollars over 30 years with more than 1,000 forgeries, allowing him to jet set around the world. His highest earning work was a Martin Johnson Heade forgery that sold for more than $700,000.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:37 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

The Movie Regina King Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Patrick Renna as Hamilton 'Ham' Porter in 1993 sports film, The Sandlot.
John Bramley The Kobal Collection / 20th Century Fox

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 5:04 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actress Regina King, whose credits include Jerry Maguire and Ray, and who currently stars on the TNT TV show Southland, the movie she could watch a million times is The Sandlot.


INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

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The Picture Show
2:35 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

Documenting Haiti's Ruined Grandeur

A view of the collapsed cupola of the National Palace is seen in Port-au-Prince on Aug. 13. The palace, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake that killed an estimated 200,000 people, was supposed to be demolished, but the plans have been put on hold.
Swoan Parker Courtesy of Reuters

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 5:04 pm

Photojournalist Swoan Parker recently toured Haiti's National Palace, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake. NPR's Laura Sullivan interviewed Parker about her photos of the once-grand building.

Laura Sullivan: It looks like the building is literally falling down on top of you — how dangerous was it to walk around this former palace?

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Music Interviews
1:19 pm
Sun August 26, 2012

The Avett Brothers: Matters Of Life And Death

The Avett Brothers are real-life siblings Scott (left) and Seth Avett (right), and bass player Bob Crawford. The band's newest album is The Carpenter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 6:15 pm

In 2009, The Avett Brothers became one of the surprise hits of the year. Paste Magazine considered their I and Love and You the best album of that year, calling it "an overpowering acoustic album brimming with sadness and soul."

That sadness took on new meaning recently. Bassist Bob Crawford took a temporary leave from the band to tend to his infant daughter, Hallie, after she developed a brain tumor.

Next month, The Avett Brothers release a new album, The Carpenter, which explores the delicate balance between life and death.

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Presidential Race
8:16 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

RNC Shuts Down Monday's Events Due To Storm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

The Republican National Convention, in Tampa, has canceled almost all events for Monday night, citing Tropical Storm Isaac. Convention organizers made that announcement, saying safety is their primary concern. NPR's Jeff Brady is in Tampa, and he joins us now. Jeff, tell us what's happening.

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