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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Army Successfully Tests Hypersonic Missile

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 8:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Imagine flying from L.A. to New York in about 30 minutes. That's roughly eight times the speed of sound. And yesterday, the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command managed to launch a missile that flew at that speed. The test missile was sent from Hawaii to hit a site on the Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific about 2,400 miles away, and within a half hour, the missile struck its target. And the military is hoping to speed it up even more.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Week In Politics: Gingrich, Debt Panel

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Clinton To 'Test Waters' In Myanmar

President Obama says his Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will visit Myanmar next month, the first such visit in half a century. Relations between the U.S. and Myanmar have been strained during years of rule by a secretive military junta, but its new president has started a process of reform that the U.S. wants to encourage. Michele Kelemen

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

LA County Sheriff Reopens Natalie Wood Case

The Los Angeles County Sheriff is reopening the investigation into the death of Hollywood legend Natalie Wood. She died in 1981 while on a yacht anchored off Catalina Island with her husband Robert Wagner and actor Christopher Walken. At the time, her death was ruled an accidental drowning. Karen Grigsby Bates

NPR Story
5:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Obama Turns Focus On Pacific Allies

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama arrived in Indonesia today, the latest stop in a 10 day trip across the Pacific. He's used the trip to send a message that the U.S. is shifting its attention to the Asia Pacific region, both for economic and security reasons. That includes the announcement yesterday that the U.S. will deploy 2,500 Marines to Australia.

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Author Interviews
4:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

U.S. Behind The Curve In Drunk Driving, Author Finds

A new book called One for the Road explores the history of drunk driving and attitudes around it.
iStockphoto.com

When Barron Lerner was writing his book on the history of drunk driving in America — and efforts to control it — he carried out an experiment at home that involved a bottle of vodka, a shot glass and a Breathalyzer. He was the guinea pig.

"I was trying to figure out just how drunk you had to be in order to not drive safely," says Lerner, a professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University, who wrote One for the Road. He decided to drink and test his levels — but he didn't actually get into a car.

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Europe
4:09 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Discovery Of Neo-Nazi Crime Spree Roils Germany

Germany has been rocked by allegations that a small, underground neo-Nazi group calling itself the Nationalist Socialist Underground carried out a 13-year-long crime spree that included murder, robbery and bombing. Here, a screen shot from a promotional DVD reportedly made by neo-Nazis Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boenhardt. The two men committed suicide earlier this month.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 4:30 am

Germany is reeling from revelations this week that a small neo-Nazi group carried out a deadly, decade-long crime wave. Authorities blame the underground cell for the murders of nine immigrants and a policewoman, a string of bank robberies and a bombing. Two suspects are dead and two others are in custody.

The identity of the suspects came as a shock to many in a country that has worked hard to overcome the stain of Nazism. Now, the focus is on the apparent shortcomings of Germany's domestic security services.

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The Record
4:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

A Televised Singing Competition With A Mission

Pia Maria Holmgren (Sámi in Sweden) performs at last year's Liet International minority song contest.
Sandro Weltin/Council of Europe

Auditions are now underway for next May's Eurovision Song Contest — that often-ridiculed television spectacle that has drawn millions of viewers around the world every year since 1956. In 2012 the host country will be Azerbaijan, since that country fielded last year's winner.

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History
3:06 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Dead Sea Scrolls On Display In Times Square

The ancient texts can be seen up close — right in the middle of New York City. There are some theatrics, but NPR's Margot Adler reports that the exhibit is happily understated.

NPR Story
3:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Rep. Bachus Defends Trades

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Spencer Bachus faces questions about his stock purchases.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 7:52 pm

The STOCK Act, a bill that would ban members of Congress from trading stock based on nonpublic information they get because they're lawmakers, has 61 co-sponsors and counting. And after years of languishing with only one hearing, the measure is getting one in the House Financial Services Committee.

What's remarkable about this is that the STOCK Act had just nine co-sponsors last week. What changed? The CBS news magazine 60 Minutes did a story about congressional insider trading.

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