Morning Edition

Local Programming:
6:59 AM - Angler Report with Cpt. Joe Ward
7:20 AM - Skywatch with Jon Bell

7:20 AM: Floridays with Janie Gould.

7:28 AM: Excursions in Geography with Jim Lett.
8:50 AM: Lifelines with Patricia Corey

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f666e1c8ba0921b2840b|5187f660e1c8ba0921b28404

Pages

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:55 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color.
Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 9:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

Read more
Fine Art
2:54 am
Thu June 27, 2013

A Paris Vacation For Nashville Millionaires' French Art

A table (Le Dejeuner), an 1892 oil painting by Edouard Vuillard, appears to show a quiet domestic scene. But Isabelle Cahn, the curator of a new show at the Musee d'Orsay, says this painting actually depicts a scandal-ridden household.
Courtesy Musee d'Orsay

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:05 pm

To say that Nashvillean Spencer Hays is crazy for French art is an understatement. "French art just quickens our step, fires our spirit and touches our heart," he says.

Hays' passion began when he was in his 30s. By then he was already a millionaire; Forbes estimated his worth at $400 million in 1997, money earned from book-selling and clothing businesses. Hays had humble beginnings.

Read more
Humans
5:12 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Pitch-Perfect: Why Our Shoulders Are Key To Throwing

Harry Kaplan practices pitching during Home Run Baseball Camp at Friendship Recreation Center in June. Kaplan's arm is stretched long and toward the ground as his hips are faced away from the catcher. A chimp, in contrast, could never throw a fastball.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:01 pm

The ability to throw a baseball or any object with speed and precision is unique to us humans. And that ability depends on certain features of our anatomy that arose in our ancestors over 2 million years ago, according to a study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.

Read more
Law
11:13 am
Wed June 26, 2013

The Supreme Court's Landmark Decision On Same-Sex Marriage

David Greene speaks with NPR's Nina Totenberg about the Supreme Court's landmark decision granting federal benefits to married same-sex couples.

Law
11:13 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Supreme Court Strikes Down Defense Of Marriage Act

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Business
7:35 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Delta CEO Helps Worried Mom Make Her Flight

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business - which is: Courtesy Seating.

Jessie Frank was a distraught mom who was going to be late picking up her daughter at camp.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She was on stand-by in Washington, D.C. for an over-booked Delta Flight to New York, when a man offered up his seat. Turns out it was Delta CEO Richard Anderson. His kindness helped the mom and earned some good PR for the company.

Read more
Europe
7:22 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Famous Hawk Is Back In The Spotlight

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Wimbledon is underway, which means the tennis world's most famous hawk is back in the spotlight. No, not the Hawk-Eye ball tracking technology linesmen use to help make calls, an actual hawk. His name is Rufus, and his job is to scare pesky pigeons away from the All England Club before the crowds of tennis fans arrive. Rufus also worked the 2012 Olympics. The hawk, of course, has his own Twitter account to squawk at his admirers. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
6:06 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Russian Official Encourages 'Food Patriotism'

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with health advice from Russia.

Gennady Onishchenko, the country's chief sanitary inspector, is encouraging food patriotism. Translation: More borscht - cut the meals at McDonald's. The fast food chain is popular in many Russian cities. But Mr. Onishchenko had more to say. To beat the summer heat, he said people should just get to work early, rather than wear, quote, "spotted little pants that stop above the knees." We think he's referring to shorts.

Law
5:27 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Voting Rights Ruling By Supreme Court Draws Mixed Reactions

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As we've been hearing, the reaction to the court's decision was strong and immediate.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Obama said he was deeply disappointed and he called on Congress to act. Civil rights groups say they have lost the most powerful weapon in their effort to ensure equal access at the polls.

MONTAGNE: But as NPR's Pam Fessler reports, some lawmakers in states where voting laws changed - voting law changes were subject to federal approval are saying they're finally free of an unfair burden.

Read more
National Security
5:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

NSA Leaker Cases Causes Riff Between U.S. And Russia

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Edward Snowden may have intended to stir things up about secret American surveillance programs. It turns out, he's also shaking up diplomatic relations between the U.S. and three countries where those relations are already edgy. The former intelligence contractor who leaked classified documents is believed to be still at a Moscow airport.

He arrived there from Hong Kong on Sunday. NPR's State Department Correspondent Michele Kelemen joins us to talk about the countries drawn into Snowden's travels. Good morning.

Read more

Pages