Talk Of The Nation on HD2

2 to 4 p.m.
Neal Conan

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

Hickenlooper And List On Pre-Election Atmosphere

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 1:58 pm

The push for civil unions recently failed in Colorado, and Governor John Hickenlooper has some ideas about why. Also, former Nevada Governor Bob List talks about the influence of Ron Paul on the Republican Party. And NPR's Political Junkie columnist Ken Rudin rounds up the news.

NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

Democrat 'Appalled' By Wisconsin Recall

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 2:01 pm

Wisconsin Democrats hope to unseat Republican Governor Scott Walker in a recall election. In the Los Angeles Times, Jonathan Zimmerman, a lifelong Democrat, says he is "appalled." The recall, he writes, "epitomizes the petty, loser-take-all vindictiveness of contemporary American politics."

NPR Story
1:45 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

'Life, Interrupted' By Cancer Diagnosis At 22

On the day before Suleika Jaouad's first chemotherapy treatment in June 2011, an oncology nurse shaved her head.
Seamus McKiernan

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 12:14 pm

Just months after moving to Paris to start her first full-time job, Suleika Jaouad was diagnosed with cancer — acute myeloid leukemia. Like many who face life-threatening illnesses in their 20s, she is coping with a dwindling sense of independence — increasingly relying on her parents for care — while simultaneously dealing with the very adult issues of mortality, infertility and disease.

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From Our Listeners
10:07 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Letters: Losing Faith And Military Marriages

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NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

At 96, Historian Lewis Reflects On 'A Century'

Bernard Lewis is also the author of the best-selling What Went Wrong?
Alan Kolc

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 8:42 am

Over his long academic career, Bernard Lewis has arguably become the world's greatest historian of the Middle East. Now, at 96, Lewis turns his attention inward in a memoir that looks back on his life, work and legacy.

The linguist and scholar's career began before World War II, and in a new memoir he covers more than a few sensitive areas, from race and slavery in Islam, to the clash of civilizations and his long argument with scholar Edward Said, to his role as an adviser to former Vice President Dick Cheney.

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Race
2:07 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

The Politics Of Fat In Black And White

Alice Randall is also the author of The Wind Done Gone.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 12:13 pm

"Many black women are fat because we want to be." With those words in a New York Times op-ed, novelist Alice Randall sparked a controversy. Touching on flashpoints of race, weight, politics and gender, her contention prompted a debate and raised serious questions about health, culture and race.

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Sports
2:07 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Fan Says Tear Down Wrigley To Save The Cubs

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Fans of the Chicago Cubs come up with all kinds of explanations for the team's epic ineptitude: the curse of the Billy Goat, Steve Bartman's 2003 foul ball catch, and generations of incompetent management. In the Wall Street Journal today, Rich Cohen comes to a different conclusion: Wrigley Field. Destroy it, annihilate it, he wrote. Implosion or explosion, get rid of it, not merely the structure but the ground on which it stands.

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Law
2:07 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

'Stop And Frisk' Works, But It's Problematic

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 10:07 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The New York City police reported that its officers stopped and frisked almost 700,000 people last year, which prompted a fresh round of protests over the controversial policy. In today's Washington Post, Richard Cohen writes that these questionable tactics have to be measured against their effects. New York City is heaven on earth, he wrote, possibly because it is a certain kind of hell for young black and Hispanic men. Do results justify questionable police tactics?

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Opinion
2:52 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Op-Ed: Euro Crisis 'Uniquely Greek'

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now, the Opinion Page. Markets around the world continue to fall. After losing ground several days in a row, the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 80 points at last glance as the political stalemate drags on in Greece. A final push is set to begin tomorrow in Athens to form a coalition government after elections that served as an angry rebuke of austerity by Greek voters. Analysts are increasingly concerned that Greece's political paralysis may lead that country to leave the eurozone and head towards default.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Shocking' Dinner With Washington

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 10:35 am

In 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited African-American educator Booker T. Washington, who had become close to the president, to dine with his family at the White House. Several other presidents had invited African-Americans to meetings at the White House, but never to a meal. And in 1901, segregation was law.

News of the dinner between a former slave and the president of the United States became a national sensation. The subject of inflammatory articles and cartoons, it shifted the national conversation around race at the time.

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