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Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America. 

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri March 16, 2012

Should The U.S. Speed Up Afghanistan Withdrawal?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, you've no doubt seen your share of crime dramas where the suspect feels the need to confess. Our next guest, the author of a number of books about faith and spirituality is going to join us to tell us why a confession in real life is a lot less dramatic, but more accessible and useful in the long run, than the TV version.

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Arts & Life
12:00 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

Joan Chen: No More Concubine, Dragon Lady Roles

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 9:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now, it's time for our Wisdom Watch conversation. That's where we speak with those who have made a difference through their work.

With us today, award-winning actress Joan Chen. She was born to two physicians in China and wound up becoming a star in two countries. Only 19 when she took home the Chinese equivalent of the Oscar for best actress, she was hailed as the Elizabeth Taylor of China before she moved to the U.S.

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Books
12:51 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Bad Girls Of History, How Wicked Were They?

Cleopatra: Serpent of the Nile is one in a collection for children called The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Dastardly Dames.
Courtesy of Goosebottom Books

With great power comes not-so-great nicknames. At least, that was the case for some of the most notorious queens and female rulers in history:

Egypt's Cleopatra: "Serpent of the Nile."

Rome's Agrippina: "Atrocious and Ferocious."

England's Mary Tudor: "Bloody Mary."

France's Catherine de Medici: "The Black Queen."

France's Marie Antoinette: "Madame Deficit."

China's Cixi: "The Dragon Empress."

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Television
12:00 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Film Aimed At Getting Bystanders To 'Speak Up'

As many as a quarter of U.S. students report being a victim of bullying. This Sunday, the Cartoon Network will air Speak Up, a new documentary that shares the stories of victims. Host Michel Martin speaks with bullying expert Duane Thomas and Aaron Cheese, a student featured in the film.

Books
12:00 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Bad Girls Of History, How Wicked Were They?

Egypt's Cleopatra was called "Serpent of the Nile," and England's Mary Tudor, was called "Bloody Mary." But were these names fair? That's the question editor Shirin Yim Bridges raises in the tween book series, The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Dastardly Dames. She speaks with host Michel Martin as part of Tell Me More's biography series.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Two Young Men, Two Very Different Directions

The Washington Post Metro section for March 9, 2012 shows two stories, side by side, of two very different men.
Amy Ta NPR

I am dating myself here, but do you remember the 1983 film Trading Places? Where the comedians Dan Akroyd and Eddie Murphy played an investment broker and a street hustler, respectively, whose places in life were switched by the owners of Akroyd's fictional firm?

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Election 2012
12:00 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Alabama Voters Shifting Further To The Right?

Rick Santorum won the Alabama and Mississippi primaries last night, despite being outspent by GOP front-runner Mitt Romney. Santorum's wins raise questions about the candidates' ability to connect with the party's base. Host Michel Martin speaks with Mississippi Public Broadcasting's Jeffrey Hess and John Archibald of The Birmingham News.

Technology
12:00 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Controversy Comes To Boil Over 'Homeless Hotspots'

For this year's South By South West conference, some of Austin's homeless were equipped with mobile Wi-Fi devices and t-shirts inviting attendees to use these hotspots to get online. Reactions have ranged from support, to disbelief, to outrage. Host Michel Martin discusses the ethical implications with a technology reporter and an ethicist.

Politics
12:00 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Is The Voting Rights Act Still Necessary?

An effort is underway by at least two states to challenge key provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory voting practices. As voters in Alabama and Mississippi go to the polls to vote in their states' primaries, host Michel Martin discusses the act with former U.S. Congressman Artur Davis.

Your Money
12:00 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Need Fast Cash? Beware Of Triple Digit Interest

Payday loan companies promise you fast cash before your next paycheck. It may seem like a good idea, but a small loan can lead to high interest rates and mountains of debt. Guest host Allison Keyes talks with Washington Post columnist Petula Dvorak who reported on how one man's $1,500 loan could have ended up costing him $18,000.

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