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Tuesday - Saturday 2PM

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America. 

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Ethnic Studies: Teaching Resentment or Pride?

Arizona's Superintendent of Public Instruction recently put an end to Mexican American studies classes in Tucson, saying they violated state law. On Wednesday, host Michel Martin heard from Superintendent John Huppenthal. Today Martin speaks with Adelita Grijalva, the sole Tucson School Board member who voted to preserve the program.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Thu January 19, 2012

Poetry Finds New Life In New Places

For years, critics have argued about whether poetry still holds a place on this country's literary table. Host Michel Martin puts that question to writer Alan King and Lauren Wilcox, who talk about encouraging a taste for poetry in a new generation for this week's Washington Post Magazine.

Politics
12:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Why Vote On Tuesday? Why Not The Weekend?

The U.S. has repeatedly ranked low in voter turnout, compared to other G8 countries. Jacob Soboroff of the group 'Why Tuesday?' says the antiquated voting law is putting America's democracy on the back burner. He speaks with host Michel Martin about why his group, with support from liberals and conservatives, is pushing to move election days.

Education
12:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Mexican American Studies: Bad Ban Or Bad Class?

In Arizona, the Tucson Unified School District governing board recently voted to suspend the controversial Mexican American studies program. The move came after the state superintendent John Huppenthal deemed the program in violation of a state law banning, among other things, classes that promote resentment toward a race or class. He speaks with host Michel Martin.

Around the Nation
12:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Gender Controversy Stacks Up Against 'Lego Friends'

Lego introduced a new lineup of toys earlier this month meant to appeal to girls. But a petition posted on Change.org is calling on the toy maker to stop distinguishing between toys for girls and those for boys. So far, the petition has amassed over 47 thousand signatures. Host Michel Martin speaks with one of the sponsors of that petition, Bailey Shoemaker Richards.

Movie Interviews
12:00 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Dolly Parton Makes A 'Joyful Noise' On Big Screen

Oscar nominees Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah star in the new film Joyful Noise. Parton wrote a dozen songs for the movie. "Well, I love to write," she says. "Especially when I've got a challenge."
Courtesy of Van Redin

What would you do if the little town you lived in — and loved — was slowly dying, with no jobs and little hope?

In the new film Joyful Noise, a small-town Georgia church faces hard times with hallelujahs when a national competition offers their financially strapped choir its only chance at survival.

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Religion
12:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

SCOTUS Issues Landmark Religious Freedom Ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously voted last week that churches are not bound by some workplace discrimination laws. It's being called the most significant ruling on religious freedom in decades. Host Michel Martin discusses the decision with The Washington Post editorial writer and legal affairs expert Eva Rodriguez.

Money Coach
12:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Early Tips For Tax Day

As many people begin to receive their W-2 forms, host Michel Martin and accountant David Baldoza discuss tips on getting a head start on filing taxes.

Parenting
12:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Advantages And Drawbacks Of 'Accordion Families'

In sociologist Katherine Newman's new book, The Accordion Family, she argues that globalization and weak economies have caused households to expand and incorporate grandparents, parents and children under one roof. Host Michel Martin speaks with Newman and two other women who live in multi-generational homes.

World
12:00 pm
Tue January 17, 2012

Tensions Simmering 1 Year After Arab Spring

The nations that were touched by that movement are still struggling with uncertainty — from the violence in Syria, to confusion in Yemen and unease with Egypt's elections. Host Michel Martin and Al Jazeera Washington bureau chief Abderrahim Foukara discuss those issues, and rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran.

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