Floridays

Janie Gould hosts and produces “Floridays,” an award-winning weekly show that’s now in its fourth year.  She has interviewed a wide cross-section of Floridians about life in the Sunshine State, on such  topics as mullet migration, lobster harvesting, early television, colorful politicians, roadside oddities, cattle ranching, farming, home remedies and numerous other topics. “Floridays” airs every Friday at 7:20 a.m. and 6:01 p.m. on the radio at 88.9 FM or online at wqcs.org.  Past shows can be accessed by visiting the website and clicking on Audio Archive and then Programs. 

Carl Fetzer of Vero Beach painted his packinghouse machinery purple to make his citrus more appealing to prospective buyers.

Florida Photo Archives

But the Sebastian to Fellsmere line never went farther west. Fellsmere Vice Mayor Joel Tyson rode it one time,  in the 1940s.  The train is long gone, but the site is expected to become a hiking and biking trail.

 

USGS

Janet Reno, attorney general in the Clinton  administration, once tried to save the geckos living inside the house, including a supersized one dubbed Moby Gecko, before it was tented for termites. Her sister, former Martin County Commissioner Maggy Hurchalla, tells the story.

Google Images

When school was out, Marilyn Cato Anderson and other children came up with their own entertainment. She and her sisters played a game they called "J.C. Penney's" in their large grapefruit tree.

 

Melba Campbell says slaughtering pigs taught her not to be afraid of the sight of  blood or "messy things."     

Surfer Remembers 'Boiler' Beyond the Surf

May 21, 2012

The boiler of a ship that sank more than a century ago was visible to Vero beach-goers for years. Bibble Irvin says surfers used to swim out to the boiler and stay all day. 

Janie Gould (2012-01-11) 

FORT PIERCE (wqcs) - The Fort Pierce police station is being re-named Thursday in honor of Officers Grover Cooper and Jimmy Wouters, killed in the line of duty 25 years ago. Officer Robert Spring, wounded in the cocaine raid, talks about what happened Jan. 12, 1987, and later. © Copyright 2012, wqcs  

David Gibson also grew pineapples in what's now northern Indian River County in the 19th century. Folks took note of his odd apparel, says Pam Cooper, Florida history and genealogy librarian at the Indian River County main library.

Before 'pill mills,' moonshine was king in Florida

Apr 12, 2012

Veteran law enforcement officer Jim Mills of Martin County, now retired, remembers trucks loaded with  moonshine made in North Florida that tried to pass through Stuart en route to Miami.

Some people hunted the big birds during the

Depression.

Pages