Tune in for 4th of July Specials

This Friday evening at 7, enjoy the Capitol Steps one-hour long special, "Politics Takes a Holiday!" It's the most wonderful time of the year when Presidential candidates emerge from their political slumbers and proclaim themselves fit to rule this Nation. The singing political comedians the Capitol Steps will take on Jeb Bush, Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz, Bernie Sanders and all the other "76 Unknowns" who have thrown their hat (and your money) into the ring. It's time to "Mock the Vote" in...
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Florida's highway rest areas, service plazas and welcome centers, now designated as Safe Phone Zones

To combat distracted driving crashes in Florida, the Florida Department of Transportation and GEICO Insurance have teamed up by designating Florida's highway rest areas, service plazas and welcome centers as Safe Phone Zones.
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Transforming The Norton

Drew Mello talks with Scott Bernarde, Director of Communications for the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. The Norton’s primary summer exhibition, Going Places, addresses the design of iconic 20th century vehicles, the history of transportation and its impact on our lives. Going Places will be on display from June 25 through January 10 of next year. The Norton will be offering free admission to all Florida residents on Thursdays through September 3. Palm Beach County residents can...
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When The Fish You Eat Have Eaten Something Toxic

12 minutes ago

Some tasty saltwater fish carry a toxin that you may never have heard of.

And a recent study found that more people in Florida may be getting sick from eating fish contaminated with the toxin than previously thought.

By comparing Florida public health records with survey results from thousands of fishermen, scientists from the University of Florida found that ciguatera fish poisoning, as the condition is called, is significantly underreported in the state.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Syrian forces have carried out airstrikes to push back what is being described as a major offensive by militants affiliated with al-Qaida to seize the key northern city of Aleppo.

As NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Turkish border, the battle surprised the regime, but also surprised more moderate rebels, who tell NPR they are not part of the offensive.

Chocolate might be headed toward a crisis, depending on whom you ask.

That's at least what the 2015 Cocoa Barometer has to say. It's an overview of sustainability issues in the cocoa sector, written by various European and U.S. NGOs, and was released in the U.S. this week. And what they're really worried about is the people who grow the beans that are ground up to make our beloved treat.

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

Despite the prime minister urging a thumbs down, the "yes" vote holds a slight edge in Greece ahead of a referendum on whether the country should accept the terms of an international bailout, according to one poll.

In another, however, the "nays" have it.

One survey, conducted by the respected ALCO institute just 48 hours before the referendum that could decide Greece's economic fate and future in the eurozone, gives the "yes" camp 44.8 percent against 43.4 percent for the "no" side, according to Reuters.

A Russian rocket filled with much-needed supplies for the International Space Station lifted off from a pad in Kazakhstan early today after two previous re-supply missions failed.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that the successful launch of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, known as the Progress 60P, which is set to dock with the station on Sunday, was a relief to the astronauts and cosmonauts on the space station.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In 1776, the American colonies declared independence from Britain.

But it wasn't until 1796 that someone dared to tackle a question that would plague every generation of Americans to come: "What is American food?"

American Cookery, the very first American cookbook, was written by Amelia Simmons (more on this mysterious woman later). In it, she promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality. The title page stated that the recipes were "adapted to this country and all grades of life."

Their gourds tell a story — and earn them a living. That gourd in the photo — the one on the left? It is covered with miniature pictures of a potato harvest in Peru. There's even a wee burro hauling the day's crop.

That gourd will sell for around $800.

Elisavet Zachariadou is a retired professor of history in Athens. She admires Italian art and reads French literature and German philosophy. She considers herself a European.

"When I learned that Greece is going to be part of the European Union [in the 1980s], I was very happy," she recalls. "And I said, 'How nice. And how good for all of us.' "

But Zachariadou's attachment to Europe is complex. She's 84 and lives in the Athens suburb where she grew up during World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded Greece and her people suffered horribly.

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