Peter Kenyon

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript TESS VIGELAND, HOST: Turkey will need to start forming a temporary government next week after politicians failed to agree on a coalition to run parliament. But gridlocked politicians are fast becoming the least of Turkey's worries. Dozens of security forces and hundreds of Kurdish fighters have been killed after the collapse of a two-year ceasefire. Sympathizers of ISIS have named Turkey as their latest target. And on top...

The U.N. Security Council endorsed a historic nuclear deal with Iran on Monday, and it immediately drew complaints from hard-liners in Tehran as well as from lawmakers — particularly Republicans — in the U.S. The agreement , negotiated with Iran and the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China, sharply restricts Iran's nuclear program for the next decade or more in return for relief from painful economic sanctions. But the agreement still has to pass muster in world capitals,...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Now to Vienna and the talks there over Iran's nuclear program. Through the weekend and continuing today, the U.S., other world powers and Iran have been in tense negotiations and been limiting Iran's ability to develop nuclear weapons in exchange for easing economic sanctions. NPR's Peter Kenyon is covering the talks, and he joins me now from Vienna. Hi, Peter. PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Hi, Robert. SIEGEL:...

After four years of war, Syrians are everywhere in Istanbul — on street corners, squatting in abandoned buildings. But a new venture run by Syrian and Turkish book lovers aims to be a cultural oasis for Arabic readers, and, along the way, give Turks a fuller picture of the Syrians, Iraqis and Libyans increasingly filling the city. In a painstakingly restored old wooden house in a working class neighborhood, Syrians, Iraqis and Turks mingled recently amid the shelves of the Pages bookstore. A...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Turkey's voters yesterday sent shockwaves through a ruling party that has dominated Turkish politics for over a decade. The ruling AKP is losing its majority in Parliament. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that a pro-Kurdish party has muscled its way onto the political scene. PETER KENYON, BYLINE: After a euphoric night of celebration by Turkish opposition parties, Turks woke today wondering just what the...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Turkey holds parliamentary elections tomorrow, and a pro-Kurdish party might win new votes from Kurds and majority Turks alike. The two groups are often at odds, but they're both upset with President Erdogan. They believe he's too close to Islamists in Syria and has spent too much money on the enormous presidential palace in Ankara. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that Kurds are especially disappointed at Mr....

Mutlu Kaya is gifted with a strong, pure voice, and it nearly cost her her life. Or rather, many Turkish women say, it was the reaction to her singing by the men in Kaya's life. She's in the hospital, a bullet in her skull. It started with a visit to Kaya's hometown by well-known Turkish folk singer Sibel Can. Can was a judge on a moderately popular TV singing show, and she was convinced Kaya could be a star. A promotional video posted online shows Can, Kaya and her mother on a couch as Kaya...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: One dilemma for the U.S. approach to the long Syrian civil war has been which groups to back against the regime of Bashar al-Assad. The U.S. only recently agreed with its ally, Turkey, on training some so-called moderate rebel forces, but that's being overshadowed by a joint effort between Turkey and Arab countries to support more radical rebels who are already in the fight. NPR's Peter Kenyon has this...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARUN RATH, HOST: Of course, Turkey still rejects the term genocide to describe the Armenian killings, but the government is gradually allowing its minority populations more avenues of expression, including the arts. NPR's Peter Kenyon attended a rare and moving Istanbul concert performance of Armenian music and poetry this week. Here's a taste of what it was like. PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Despite modest advertising, people...

A century after Ottoman forces massacred an estimated 1 to 1.5 million Armenian Christians, some of the remaining Armenian Turks are taking tentative steps out into the open. They survived because their ancestors were taken in by Muslim families and raised as Muslims. Now, thanks in part to a somewhat more tolerant climate in Turkey, their descendants, known as "hidden Armenians," are coming out of hiding. In the ancient walled city of Diyarbakir in southeast Turkey, a visitor probing the...

Heads of state and thousands of guests traveled to the windswept shores of western Turkey on Friday to mark the 100th anniversary of one of World War I's most infamous battles. The Gallipoli campaign saw Ottoman forces, fighting under German command, repel an Allied attack led by Britain and France. Nine months of fighting left a half-million dead and wounded on both sides. The Allies withdrew, setting in motion events that would leave the region forever changed. It's called ANZAC Day, for...

Armenians are preparing to mark on Friday the 100th anniversary of the killing of as many as 1.5 million of their ancestors by the Ottoman Empire. And Turks are getting ready to celebrate the centennial of a major military victory by the Ottoman forces over the Allied powers at Gallipoli in World War I. Turkey traditionally holds the Gallipoli ceremonies on April 25, which falls on Saturday this year. But it is moving up the events by one day to Friday in what critics call a clumsy attempt to...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Negotiators in Switzerland remain divided over what to do about Iran's nuclear program. They say they will not reach a political accord by a self-imposed midnight deadline. They will keep talking, but the tone of comments is growing more downbeat. NPR's Peter Kenyon begins our coverage. PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Days of relatively upbeat assessments gave way to hard-nosed bargaining today and talk of...

Diplomats seeking the framework of a deal to limit Iran's nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief are taking leave of Switzerland — but only for a few days. "Yes, we are all leaving," a smiling Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said as he walked past reporters at the luxury Beau Rivage Hotel in Lausanne, site of the 1920s treaty that finally dissolved the Ottoman Empire. Days and nights of intensive talks on the shore of Lake Geneva brought the sides closer to an...

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